NY Medical Board Charges Psychiatrist Arnold Mandelstam with Harassing Patients, Moral Unfitness; Probed Vulnerable Female Patients for Details of Their Sex Lives

June 17, 2022

On October 18, 2021, the New York State Board for Professional Medical Conduct issued a Statement of Charges against psychiatrist Arnold Mandelstam, charging him with willfully harassing, abusing, or intimidating a patient; negligence on more than one occasion; gross negligence; and moral unfitness.

The Board’s document includes the following details which form the basis of the charges:

A. Mandelstam treated “Patient A” from on or about February 6, 2014 through on or about May 25,2017. Patient A sought treatment with Mandelstam after her brother's sudden death from a heroin overdose and reported a history of a traumatic childhood and worsening depression. Mandelstam deviated from accepted medical standards in that he:

1. Made inappropriate sexual remarks to Patient A not for a legitimate medical purpose.

2. Asked Patient A inappropriate sexual questions not for a legitimate medical purpose.

3. Told Patient A intimate details of his personal life with his wife not for a legitimate medical purpose.

4. Made references to his own body and physical condition to Patient not for a legitimate medical purpose.

5. On or about May 25, 2017, continued to probe Patient A about her sex life not for a legitimate medical purpose, during which time he put his hand in his pocket and began rubbing his penis. Patient A saw that he had an erection. This was the last session Patient A attended with Respondent.

B. Mandelstam treated “Patient B” from on or about October 12, 2000 through on or about June 18, 2009. Patient B sought treatment with Mandelstam for her reported anxiety which she attributed to her significant history of childhood sexual abuse. Mandelstam deviated from accepted medical standards in that he:

1. Made inappropriate sexual remarks to Patient B not for a legitimate medical purpose.

2. Asked Patient B inappropriate sexual questions not for a legitimate medical purpose.

3. Told Patient B intimate details of his personal life with his wife not for a legitimate medical purpose.

4. Made references to his own body and physical condition to Patient B not for a legitimate medical purpose.

Source: Statement of Charges in the Matter of Arnold Mandelstam, M.D., New York State Department of Health State Board for Professional Medical Conduct, October 18, 2021.

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